Politics+Society

A photo portrait of Alissa Carlat Ruxin '97shows her standing in front of her restaurant, Heaven.
Fall 2018
Alissa Carlat Ruxin ’97 never thought she’d be a restaurateur and hotelier—much less one living in Rwanda. But in 2007, she launched Heaven, a “modern African” restaurant that has become a popular destination in Kigali, the capital.More
A photo of Katrina Mitchell '96.
Fall 2018
Early on, Katrina Mitchell ’96 learned to look beyond herself to meeting the needs of a larger extended community. Her journey has taken her from the Children’s Defense Fund to the United Way of Greater Atlanta, where she is executive director of the Child Well-Being Movement.More
A photo shows Cheryl Finley ’86 signing books at the Featherstone Center for the Arts in Oak Bluffs, Mass.
Fall 2018
A simple abolitionist illustration of human beings packed like cargo into the suffocating lower decks of a slave ship retains all its heart-stopping power. In Committed to Memory: The Art of the Slave Ship Icon , art historian Cheryl Finley ’86 details the history behind the image.More
The cover of SAVING CENTRAL PARK depicts author Elizabeth Barlow Rogers leaning against a large rock outcropping in the park, with the silhouettes of skyscapers visible in the background.
Fall 2018
Elizabeth Barlow Rogers ’57, New York City’s first Central Park administrator and recipient of the 1989 Alumnae Achievement Award, has written a memoir/history of her remarkable leadership in restoring, conserving, and managing the city’s green heart.More
The cover of INVESTED depicts three glass jars with coins in them, one almost empty, one half-full, and one overflowing.
Fall 2018
Danielle Town ’03, corporate lawyer and daughter of an investment guru, realized that her successful career was not bringing her the financial freedom and happiness she desired. Invested details her 12-month journey from finance novice to making investments on her own.More
A photo shows the hands of several African people reaching for water dripping from a metal tap.
Fall 2018
Lest We Forget chronicles the time Kwan Kew Lai ’74 spent working as a doctor during the Ebola crisis in Liberia and Sierra Leone, offering an important perspective for understanding that crisis.More
Announcing a New Jewish SIG
Fall 2018
This fall, a new shared identity group, the WJA—Wellesley Jewish Alumnae—made its debut, It seeks to provide connections among Jewish alumnae of any denomination. “To be a member of WJA, an alumna need only self-identify as Jewish,” says Leah Kaplan ’02, the new SIG’s interim president.More
A photo shows members of WAAD and WLAN dressed up and gathered for their annual tea in L.A.
Fall 2018
In June, Wellesley alumnae gathered in L.A for the 15th anniversary of the WAAD-WLAN annual tea, which they termed its “Quinceañera”—after the traditional celebration for a girl’s 15th birthday. WAAD is the Wellesley Alumnae of African Descent shared identity group and WLAN is the Wellesley Latina Alumnae Network.More
A photo shows Wellesley women marching with a rainbow flag and the Wellesley banner at the New York City Pride Parade in June.
Fall 2018
June 24 was a day of exuberant celebration and shared connections among the alumnae—ranging from the class of ’64 to ’18—who turned out for the New York City Pride March.More
A photo portrait of Missy Siner Shea '89, executive director of the WCAA
Fall 2018
The work of the Alumnae Association requires a dual view of Wellesley. One eye is trained on a rearview mirror, so we can clearly see and understand the experiences and traditions of alumnae. And the other eye necessarily looks out the windows of our offices onto the Academic Quad, where we can bring into view today’s students.More