Politics+Society

Freshink
Spring 2017
Recent publications by Wellesley authorsMore
Admission To Adulthood
Spring 2017
Small Admissions tells the thoroughly engaging story of three Wellesley roommates who embark on their postcollege lives in New York City.More
The Ethics of Health Care
Spring 2017
Charlene Galarneau’s classes explore health in a way that touches on racism, sexism, and privilege—from water activism to transgender justice.More
How Race Shapes Reality
Winter 2017
Markella “Kelly” Rutherford, associate professor of sociology, advises students in the College’s new interdisciplinary minor in comparative race and ethnicity.More
Keeping Wellesley Modern
Winter 2017
Alice Friedman, the Grace Slack McNeil Professor of Art, is a huge proponent of the Jewett Arts Center, Paul Rudolph’s breakthrough building completed in 1958.More
Between Beauty and Darkness
Winter 2017
In 2010, a Paris apartment that had been shuttered for decades was opened, revealing a wealth of antiques, paintings, and other artifacts of a time long past.More
Family Formation and the Law
Fall 2016
In Love’s Promises, Martha Ertman ’85 blends memoir and law to argue that contracts (along with more informal deals) facilitate the formation and sustenance of modern families, along with—in various combinations—reproductive technology, adoption, cohabitation, and marriage.More
Tell Me a Story
Fall 2016
When Molly Bang ’65 was a Wellesley student, the idea of becoming a children’s author and illustrator seemed about as achievable as growing a magical beanstalk. But that’s exactly what she did.More
An Eye On the Judiciary
Summer 2016
“They’re violating the spirit of the Constitution, and they know it,” Associate Professor of Political Science Nancy Scherer said when we spoke this spring about the refusal of Senate Republicans to hold hearings on the nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the U.S. Supreme Court.More
Breaking the Mold
Summer 2016
During her first three years at Wellesley, Coombes, a Japanese language and culture major, worked 40 hours a week at Wal-Mart and commuted to campus, an hour each way, five days a week. That schedule was bearable, she says, because she enjoyed what she was learning about Japanese history and culture.More