From the President - For Homepage Use

From the President

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Illustration of a mailbox with the spring issue of Wellesley magazine in it
As we work to be both eco- and budget-conscious, we are piloting opt-in to print to ensure that we mail the print version of Wellesley magazine only to alumnae who wish to receive it.More
Cover of Grace Ramsdell's diary; a black notebook with a yellow crescent moon and four stars
In October 2020, our student assistant texted me a video from her grandmother’s house in rural Vermont: her hands opening the journal and flipping through the entire book, chock full of her small, neat handwriting, interspersed with dried leaves and flowers.More
A photo of Massachusetts State Rep. Liz Miranda ’02 delivering her commencement address
On Friday, June 4, 570 members of the class of 2021 celebrated the College’s 143rd commencement. President Paula Johnson welcomed the seniors gathered on Severance Green and some 100 graduates attenging remotely from around the United States and overseas.More
Sophie Hurwitz ’21 (above right) and Madison Ann Lee ’21 (above left)
Despite some big changes during the pandemic, the role of The Wellesley News hasn’t changed—to amplify student voices, serve as a record of life on campus and issues students care about, and provide practical training in journalistic writing.More
Illustration of a globe (representing the Earth) with a butterfly flying out of it
In April, Wellesley announced a plan to address the urgent challenge of climate change that will affect how the College produces and distributes energy, how the endowment is invested, and how the campus community works together to reduce energy consumption.More
A photo of the handmade artist's book, Mending the Stars & Stripes
Jan Owen’s artist’s book Mending the Stars & Stripes came into existence last year through a confluence of historic events.More
A photo ofJennifer Chudy, Knafel Assistant Professor of Social Sciences and assistant professor of political science
Jennifer Chudy, Knafel Assistant Professor of Social Sciences and assistant professor of political science, studies American politics with an emphasis on race and ethnicity—phenomena currently at the very heart of political debate in the United States.More
A piece of art by Barbara Page '66 is a pictogram depicting a rose and a bird on 3-by-5-inch library checkout card for the book "A Secret Garden."
Book Marks: An Artist’s Card Catalog, an art book by Barbara Page ’66, kept our reviewer up into the night reading.More
The cover of Once Upon a Quinceañera by Monica Gomez-Hira ’95 is a painting of a young woman in a ball gown atop a cake decorated with pink flamingos.
At first glance, Once Upon a Quinceañera , the debut novel by Monica Gomez-Hira ’95, looks like a youthful summer romance. Don’t believe it.More
The cover of "The Hollywood Spy" is a painting of a woman in a 1940s' evening gown, looking toward LA at night.
Susan Elia MacNeal ’91, no stranger to spycraft, has published her 10th Maggie Hope mystery.More
Recent publications by Wellesley authors.More
A photo portrait shows the new WCAA president, Laura Wood Cantopher '84, wearing a Wellesley-blue top.
“My opportunities to be a Wellesley volunteer have been a sustenance through my whole life,” says Laura Wood Cantopher ’84, the new president of the Alumnae Association.More
Four photos show, clockwise from top left, Brita Haugland Cantrell ’84, Angeles Garcia Cassin ’09, Erika Woods ’05, Jane Materazzo ’83.
New members from Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oklahoma, and Texas have joined the WCAA Board of Directors.More
Clockwise from top left are photo portraits of Marilyn Twomey Smith ’70, Bunny Winter ’70, Andrea Levitt ’71, Lois Juliber ’71.
Congratulations to the four dedicated volunteers honored with the Syrena Stackpole Awards at the virtual reunion in June.More
A. photo shows Muslim students flying kites while celebrating Eid on campus in spring 2021.
The WCAA welcomes a pilot shared identity group, Wellesley Muslim Alums (WMA), which held its first event on Zoom in April.More
Tributes to Wellesley alumnae by family and friendsMore
A photo of Dot Widmayer '52
Dorothea “Dot” J. Widmayer ’52, professor emerita of biological sciences, passed away on March 6. Teaching introductory biology and genetics, and carrying out research on gene action and expression in the protozoan Paramecium aurelia, Dot had a great positive influence on many students throughout her long career.More
A photo of John Rhodes
John Rhodes, senior lecturer emeritus of art history, died on March 21. For 28 years, from 1982 to 2010, John was a distinguished instructor in the art department and in the writing program. He was a co-author of an authoritative book on Wellesley’s landscape and architecture, published by the College in 2000.More
A photo of Tamara Nash wearing a Wellesley "W" button on her lapel
“My family taught me that education is the key to success,” says Tamara Nash ’79. It’s not surprising, then, that Tamara has built a career around higher education administration.More
A photo portrait of Stephanie Christie '00
Stephanie Christie ’00 enjoys building community and brands, which inspired her to launch WellesleyMade.com, an online directory that showcases the talented artists, makers, and entrepreneurs among Wellesley alums.More
A photo of Elsa Sebastian on the deck of a boat holding a "Save the Tongass" flag
Elsa Sebastian ’13 can’t remember a time when the Tongass National Forest wasn’t part of her life. Now she’s working to save it.More
Hannah Reese ’02
Hannah Reese’s work is changing the way that clinicians treat people with anxiety and tic disorders. A clinical scientist, researcher, and an assistant professor of psychology at Bowdoin, Hannah has been pioneering a new mindfulness-based treatment for those with Tourette’s syndrome.More
Big red tomato
Having one stranger-neighbor keeps your curiosity alive. It’s a puzzle you’ll never finish because it only gets bigger and more complicated and fun. The mystery neighbor is all the children’s literature you loved— Harriet the Spy, Tuck Everlasting, Gone-Away Lake —right there on your own street.More